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A Separate Authority (He Mana Motuhake), Volume I - Establishing the T?hoe M?ori Sanctuary in New Zealand, 1894-1915

A Separate Authority (He Mana Motuhake), Volume I - Establishing the T?hoe M?ori Sanctuary in New Zealand, 1894-1915

von: Steven Webster

Palgrave Macmillan, 2020

ISBN: 9783030410421 , 402 Seiten

Format: PDF

Kopierschutz: Wasserzeichen

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A Separate Authority (He Mana Motuhake), Volume I - Establishing the T?hoe M?ori Sanctuary in New Zealand, 1894-1915


 

This book is an ethnohistorical reconstruction of the establishment in New Zealand of a rare case of Maori home-rule over their traditional domain, backed by a special statute and investigated by a Crown commission the majority of whom were T?hoe leaders. However, by 1913 T?hoe home-rule over this vast domain was being subverted by the Crown, which by 1926 had obtained three-quarters of their reserve. By the 1950s this vast area had become the rugged Urewera National Park, isolating over 200 small blocks retained by stubborn T?hoe 'non-sellers'. After a century of resistance, in 2014 the T?hoe finally regained statutory control over their ancestral domain and a detailed apology from the Crown.



The resistance of the T?hoe M?ori of New Zealand to colonisation began more than century before the final return of their sanctuary in the Urewera mountains by the Crown in 2014. In Volume I of A Separate Authority (He Mana Motuhake), Steven Webster provides an ethnohistorical reconstruction of the establishment in New Zealand of a rare case of Maori home-rule over their traditional domain, backed by a special statute and investigated by a Crown commission, the majority of whom were T?hoe leaders. This relatively benevolent colonial policy enabled the T?hoe to control the establishment of their vast Native Reserve in a way that entrenched their social organisation, particularly their  traditional deployment of kin-based power, while at once manipulating the power of the Crown to their joint advantage from 1894 to 1908.  In Volume II, Webster documents how this same form of resistance enabled the T?hoe to withstand predatory Crown policies between 1908 and 1926, thereby retaining remnants of their ancestral sanctuary-which later became the basis upon which they won statutory control of the territory.
In both volumes of A Separate Authority (He Mana  Motuhake), Webster takes the stance of an ethnohistorian: he not only examines the various ways control over the Urewera District Native Reserve (UDNR) was negotiated, subverted or betrayed, and renegotiated during this time period, but also focuses on the role of M?ori hap?, ancestral descent groups and their leaders, including the political economic influence of extensive marriage alliances between them. The ethnohistorical approach developed here may be useful to other studies of governance, indigenous resistance, and reform, whether in New Zealand or elsewhere.